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The Chinook Dog

We are called OutlawChinooks because our frist two Chinooks were black and tan dogs which made us a little bit of an outlaw in the realm of the breed. Outlaw is our kennel name -- what that means is "Outlaw" is an exclusive word that is associated with us and our Chinook dogs. For us, it doesn't mean that we have a kennel full of Chinooks, and some of our dogs don't carry the Outlaw moniker either. Our dogs are family members and are also a great representation of Chinook dogs.

Outlaw Chinooks by Riley Photo

Dog Show Judges - we are happy to help you learn more about Chinook dogs. You are welcome to come visit or put your hands on our dogs at any show or event. Need dogs for judge's education? Let me know!

The Chinook is a friendly American breed of sled dog
developed to pull heavy loads over long distances at a quick pace. Chinooks are wonderful family companions that fit well into most suburban settings -- given enough interaction, training and exercise.

The breed was developed by Polar Explorer,
Arthur Treadwell Walden of Wonalancet, New Hampshire in the early 1900s after his return from the Alaskan Gold Rush days. The Chinook is the result of Walden's breeding program that combined a Mastiff-type dog with a Greenland husky from the Robert Peary expedition to the North Pole. The entire breed stems from one dog, born in 1917 and named "Chinook" after Walden's favorite dog from his days in Alaska. Walden was an experienced sled dog driver and also a grand publicist. Given Walden's love of public relations, he would be proud of the breed being named the State Dog of New Hampshire in 2009.

After Walden's death, Chinook breeding stock passed to Mrs. Julia Lombard and then to Perry Greene. Greene controlled the Chinook population until his death in 1963 at which point the breed's population dropped dramatically to eleven potentially breedable dogs in 1981. By 1965, the Chinook had its first appearance in the Guinness Book of World Records as the rarest dog in the world.

 In 1981, the United Kennel Club recognized the breed for registration, and The American Kennel Club recognized the Chinook in January 2013 as the 176th breed included in their registry.


You can locate more information on the Chinook through these links (some here and some off site):

Is a Chinook Right for You?  I've been thinking about all the reasons to have a Chinook, and all the reasons not to have a Chinook, and then I thought I would send you off site to a great list that explains why and why not. This link will take you to Rain Mountain Chinooks where you can decide if Chinooks are for you. I really like Chinooks, but they aren't for everyone. Chinooks are playful and wickedly smart, and although they are eager to please, you must (I really mean this) must spend time training them. The breed is versatile so lots of activities are fun for them and hopefully for you too. Chinooks need plenty of regular exercise to help keep their minds and bodies in balance -- plus walking them daily is great for you too! These dogs shed all year, and as an added bonus, they blow their downy undercoats twice a year. Plan on regularly brushing and some bathing too. If you want to learn more about the breed, let me know!


Chinook Historical Names Alphabetical Listing of Historical Chinook Dog Names.

Chinook Book and Magazine List Books and magazines for the Chinook enthusiast.

Chinook Owners Association , UKC Parent Club of the Chinook. As the parent club of the Chinook breed, the Chinook Owners Association (COA) web site is a very thorough source of information on the breed.  Check out all the information on Chinook history here as it is very informative. 

United Kennel Club Chinook breed standard  and information 

American Kennel Club Chinook breed standard and information


Chinook Education Center This informative web site gives added information on all things Chinook.


The Chinook Dog - Reading List

This list provides a variety of source documents about Chinooks and the people involved with them. It also includes historical information about explorers and exploration. There is additional information about the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, dog sledding in general and sled dog breeds other than the Chinook. Some of these books and magazines are in my possession and some are available for sale.

If you know of other magazines or books that should be on this list, please let me know.

MAGAZINES

National Geographic - September 1945
Saturday Evening Post - 11 January 1947
Parade Magazine - 26 June 1949
American Legion Magazine - July 1949
True Magazine - February 1954
Picture Post - 5 July 1952 (Published in Great Britain)
Nation's Business - September 1952
Christian Science Monitor - 26 October 1955
Down East - January 1963
Dog World - October 1985
Yankee Magazine - 1987
Bloodlines - March/April 1993
Dog World - October 1993

BOOKS

_____. (1930). Highlights of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition. New York: Tide Water Associated Oil Company.

_____. (1935). The Romance of Antarctic Adventure: With Byrd in the Antarctic in Picture and Story.

_____. (1934). The Romance of Exploration and Emergency First-Aid from Stanley to Byrd. New York: Burroughs Wellcome & Co.

Adams, Harry. (1931). Beyond the Barrier with Byrd. Chicago: M. A. Donohue & Company.

Bursey, Jack (1957). Antarctic Night: One Man's Story of 28,224 Hours at the Bottom of the World. New York: Rand McNally & Company.

Bursey, Jack. (1974). St. Lunaire: Antarctic Lead Dog. Grand Rapids: Glory Publishing Co.

Byrd, Richard E. (1930). Little America: Aerial Exploration in the Antarctic, The Flight to the South Pole. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

Carter, Paul A. (1979). Little America: Town at the End of the World. New York: Columbia University Press.

Conant, Susan . (1992) Gone to the Dogs.  (Fiction)

Cowan, James and Lois. (1993) Emergency Rescue, Trouble at Moosehead Lake.

Cowan, Nancy. (1995). On By!. Nancy Cowan.

Davis, Henry P., ed. (1953). The Modern Dog Encyclopedia. Harrisburg, PA: The Stackpole Company.

Demidoff, Lorna B. & Michael Jennings. (1986). The Complete Siberian Husky. New York: Howell Book House, Inc.

Foster, Coram. (1930). Rear Admiral Byrd and the Polar Expeditions. New York: A. L. Burt Company.

Garst, Shannon. (1946). Scotty Allan: King of the Dog-Team Drivers. New York: Julian Messner, Inc.

Gould, Laurence McKinley. (1931). Cold: The Record of An Antarctic Sledge Journey. New York: Brewer, Warren & Putnam.

Hoyt, Edwin P. (1968). The Last Explorer: The Adventures of Admiral Byrd. New York: The John Day Company.

Joerg, W. L. G. (1930). The Work of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition: 1928 - 1930. New York: American Geographical Society.

Lawrence, John. (1931). Bernt Balchen: Viking of the Air. New York: Brewer, Warren & Putnam.

McGuiness, Charles John. (1935). Sailor of Fortune: Adventures of an Irish Sailor, Soldier, Pirate, Pearl-Fisher, Gun-Runner, Rebel and Antarctic Explorer. Philadelphia: Macrae Smith Company.

McKinley, Capt Ashley. (1934). The South Pole Picture Book. New York. (contains many pictures never before published of Admiral Byrd's Trip)

Miller, Francis Trevelyan. (1930). The World's Great Adventure. Self Published.

O'Brien, John S. (1931). By Dog Sled for Byrd: 1600 Miles Across Antarctic Ice. Chicago: Thomas S. Rockwell Company.

Owen, Russell. (1952). The Conquest of the North and South Poles: Adventures of the Peary and Byrd Expeditions. New York: Random House.

Paramount Productions, Inc. (1934). Paramount Newsreel Men: With Admiral Byrd in Little America. Racine, Wisconsin: Whitman Publishing Company.

Rink, Paul. (1961). Conquering Antarctica: Richard E. Byrd. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica Press, Inc.

Rodgers, Eugene. (1990). Beyond the Barrier: The Story of Byrd's First Expedition to Antarctica. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

Rose, Lisle. (1980). Assault on Eternity. (1980). Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

Riddle, Maxwell and Eva B. Seeley. (1979). The Complete Alaskan Malamute. New York: Howell Book House, Inc.

Seeley, Eva Brunell & Martha A. L. Lane. (1930). Chinook and His Family. Boston: Ginn and Company.

Siple, Paul. (1931). A Boy Scout with Byrd. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

Smith, Dean C. (1961). By the Seat of My Pants: A Pilot's Progress from 1917 to 1930. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Strong, Charles S. (1956). We Were There With Byrd at the South Pole. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Vaughn, Norman D. (1990). With Byrd at the Bottom of the World. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole Books.

Walden, Jane Brevoort. (1931). Igloo. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.

Walden, Arthur Treadwell. (1928). A Dog-Puncher on the Yukon. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Walden, Arthur Treadwell. (1931). Leading A Dog's Life. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Walden, Arthur Treadwell. (1935). Harness and Pack. New York: American Book Company.



The Chinook Dog - Historical Names

If you know of names that should be added to this list, please let me know

A
Adak
Akela
Akema
Aketa
Aleut
Alyeska
Anoka
Anvik
Atka
Atlin
Attu
Aurora
B
Baffin
Ballarat
Baran
Barat
Barra
Barrat
Barron
Barrow
Bator
Bean Jester
Beerick
Bela
Berik
Bering
Berra
Bosco
Bunda
C
Cheechako
Cheeka
Cheena
Chena
Chiba
Cheif
Chilcoot
Chinook
Chinza
Chodi
Chuck
Chugash
Cico
Clair
Cochise
Cygnus
D
Dakin
Daku
Davik
Dek
Dirigo
Diska
Doonerk
Dralik
Dukavik
E
Elena
Endurance
Endure
Eric
Erik
Erika
F
Fairbanks
Fram
Frederick
Freyke
G
Gabreial
Gallant
Geauga
H
Harvik
Hansad
Honey
Hoonah
Hootchinoo
Hulik
Huzan
I

J
Jibo
Jiska
Jock
Jonny Rebel
K
Kafa
Kaltag
Kara
Kari
Karluk
Katvinka
Kayak
Keemo
Kee-Too
Keje
Kemo
Kenia
Kennae
Kenya
Keta
Kewalik
Kiana
Kianna
Kilbuck
Kim
Kima
Kimo
Kimrick
Kipnuk
Kiraly Bruno
Kirsti
Kishka
Kiyana
Klondike
Koba
Kobuk
Koda
Kodiac
Kodiak
Kokolik
Kolar
Koltag
Koluk
Koskoquim
Kosti
Kotick
Kurt
Kuska
Kutha
Kyrie
K-La
L
Lain
Lanu
Laska
Lavik
Liaka
Link
Linnea
M
Mankenzie
Manna
Massasoit
Maya
Meda
Mingo
Mikiluk
Mowgli
Muskeg
Myah
Myrika
Myrra
Myrrika
N
Nek
Nannanna
Nanook
Nanuk
Nartuk
Narvik
Natinis
Natranis
Needa
Nenna
Neka
Nigaluk
Nikiska
Ningo
Nokomus
Noma
Nome
Noorvil
Nootka
Norvik
Nuk
O
Ooli
Ooma
Oomalik
Oomik
Oona
P
Pago
Pinga
Pirkko
Po-Bear
Puno
Q
Quimbo
R
Raaluk
Ralik
Raluk
Rana
Rika
Riki
Ritka
Rochedo
Rowan
Ruka
S
Saluki
Salvo
Saranna
Savik
Shaquim
Shaquin
Shari
Sheena
Shira
Skoal
Skookum
Sonsceahray
Spunky
Star
Sukka
Susitska
Sweetheart
T
Tahwee
Takku
Tali
Tamane
Tammy
Tanago
Tangia
Tania
Tarkko
Tarvik
Tatler
Tavi
Tavie
Tavo
Tawny
Tangra
Tessallin
Tea
Tikki
Thor
Thule
Tia
Tikki
Toba
Togiak
Toki
Tonka
Tonka Treadwell
Toorak
Trapper
Tron
Trondak
Trondek
Tula
Tundra
Tuska
U
Ulak
Umiak
Umivik
Usta
V
W
Wasti
Wee Nieda Bee
Y
Yanna
Yopi
Yukon
Z
Zembla








This web site is provided for informational purposes only and should not be relied on as legal or technical advice. Nothing transmitted from this web site constitutes the establishment of a client relationship between you and OUTLAW CHINOOKS. Nothing contained at this web site should be construed to constitute a recommendation or endorsement of any product or service. Links are provided for user convenience and OUTLAW CHINOOKS is not responsible for content on linked sites and does not guarantee the accuracy of any information available through the links you will find at this web site. Copyright  © 1999 to present. 

Disclaimer : This is an educational web site. If you obtain information from this site, ask my opinion or assistance on health related issues, feeding suggestions and training or behavior, understand it should NOT be used "in lieu of" veterinarian's advice, diagnosis or treatment. Permission is granted to use this information for individual educational purposes only. Any other use of these materials for any other purpose violates intellectual property rights.


Chinook Dogs, Dog Training, Horses, Art, Kathleen Riley Photography, Genealogy


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